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Dear Canadians from Canuckistan, a hungry Southerner needs you
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Lira


Looks good right? But does it taste good? I don't know...
yet!

Nice day, eh? I hear spring has come, and you can already see some moose (and by that I mean the antlers of the moose have already started sprouting out of the snow). Anyway, sorry to bother you, but I need your help:

I've never had poutine. Ever. And I'm 30, so it's about time I had some. For this reason, I need your help.

A friend of mine, who's already visited your glorious country, tells me poutine is great - but the recipe is truly bizarre as it contains odd ingredients such as "liquid meat fat" and "pint stock". Do we really need these exotic ingredients to make gravy? Is there a less exotic recipe that can still be successfully poutinised? By the way, I assume the gravy is the only challenging bit, and the rest is just chips with cheese or a variation on this theme.

My happiness is in your hands... eh?
All right, this is the recipe we've got:

Ingredients
meat juices
2 tbsp liquid meat fat
30g/1oz plain flour
570ml/1 pint stock
2 tsp gravy browning (optional)
Preparation method
Collect the juices and the fat from the meat you are roasting. Put the juices in a glass jug and allow to stand for a few minutes so that the fat will rise to the surface. Skim off the fat.
Technique: Skimming stock

Watch technique
0:34 mins
Put the roasting tin that you used to cook the meat on the hob on a medium heat and add the fat. (The meat needs to be resting, covered with foil, in a warm place at this point)
Stir in the flour and cook for 1 minute.
Stir in the meat juices and gradually stir in the stock until you get a smooth gravy. Use a wooden spoon and stir all over the surface of the pan to incorporate any meat juices that are stuck to it.
Bring to the boil and allow to simmer for 10 minutes.
Season to taste and add a little gravy browning if desired.
Sykonee
Cheese curds. Always cheese curds.
Sleightful
quote:
Originally posted by Lira
I've never had poutine. Ever. And I'm 30, so it's about time I had some.


You've only gotten to 30 because you haven't eaten it regularly. :toothless
Spam
Do you know how to make a stock? Here's the very "unprofessional but it it'll work" method of making a poutine gravy.

Throw some veal/beef (or chicken, duck, whatever flavour you're going for) bones, along with a mixture of roughly-chopped carrots+white onions+celery (extra flavour, you can also add some garlic cloves) into a large pot and fill it with water. For a personal serving, you probably don't need anything larger than a 5-6L pot, but I'd use an 8L pot so as to make more gravy. I'd say 3/4 full with bones, and 1.5L of veg mix would work.

Bring to a boil and then lower the heat and let simmer for a long-ass time (about an hour for poultry stock, 1.5-2 hours for beef).

Strain the liquid, and then reduce that at a rolling simmer, tasting every once in a while to check for flavour. When it starts to take on some flavour, add some salt and pepper if you like.

Once it's reduced to about 1L of liquid, you can make a decision to reduce the out of the stock until it's a gravy-like consistency (probably about 1/3-1/2L), or:

Mix some flour (or corn starch) with cold water, and slowly add it to the stock a little bit at a time to thicken the stock and make a "gravy". If you use flour, you need to cook it out for a few minutes, corn starch is cooked by the time the gravy is boiling.
colonelcrisp
quote:
Originally posted by Lira


Looks good right? But does it taste good? I don't know...
yet!

Nice day, eh? I hear spring has come, and you can already see some moose (and by that I mean the antlers of the moose have already started sprouting out of the snow). Anyway, sorry to bother you, but I need your help:

I've never had poutine. Ever. And I'm 30, so it's about time I had some. For this reason, I need your help.

A friend of mine, who's already visited your glorious country, tells me poutine is great - but the recipe is truly bizarre as it contains odd ingredients such as "liquid meat fat" and "pint stock". Do we really need these exotic ingredients to make gravy? Is there a less exotic recipe that can still be successfully poutinised? By the way, I assume the gravy is the only challenging bit, and the rest is just chips with cheese or a variation on this theme.

My happiness is in your hands... eh?
All right, this is the recipe we've got:

Ingredients
meat juices
2 tbsp liquid meat fat
30g/1oz plain flour
570ml/1 pint stock
2 tsp gravy browning (optional)
Preparation method
Collect the juices and the fat from the meat you are roasting. Put the juices in a glass jug and allow to stand for a few minutes so that the fat will rise to the surface. Skim off the fat.
Technique: Skimming stock

Watch technique
0:34 mins
Put the roasting tin that you used to cook the meat on the hob on a medium heat and add the fat. (The meat needs to be resting, covered with foil, in a warm place at this point)
Stir in the flour and cook for 1 minute.
Stir in the meat juices and gradually stir in the stock until you get a smooth gravy. Use a wooden spoon and stir all over the surface of the pan to incorporate any meat juices that are stuck to it.
Bring to the boil and allow to simmer for 10 minutes.
Season to taste and add a little gravy browning if desired.



theres an easier way.... the best poutine in quebec comes from chip waggons, anyone who says otherwise is a heretic..... that being said we have it here in packaged form.... pm me a mailing address and ill send you a goddamn package......

the part that i most likely cant legally send you in brasil (due to import restrictions) are the cheese curds..... and in order to be a propper poutine, you need either st alberts or la frappe curd.... the closest thing to cheese curds in brasil would probably be coalho cheese. I prefer to let the curds reach room temperature before making my poutine as it maximizes the "squeak" factor. also be sure to layer the poutine before adding your gravy.... fries / curds / fries /curds so that all the squeaky artery clogging goodness isnt limited to the top surface alone.
Moral Hazard
quote:
Originally posted by colonelcrisp
theres an easier way.... the best poutine in quebec comes from chip waggons, anyone who says otherwise is a heretic..... that being said we have it here in packaged form.... pm me a mailing address and ill send you a goddamn package......

the part that i most likely cant legally send you in brasil (due to import restrictions) are the cheese curds..... and in order to be a propper poutine, you need either st alberts or la frappe curd.... the closest thing to cheese curds in brasil would probably be coalho cheese. I prefer to let the curds reach room temperature before making my poutine as it maximizes the "squeak" factor. also be sure to layer the poutine before adding your gravy.... fries / curds / fries /curds so that all the squeaky artery clogging goodness isnt limited to the top surface alone.


My guess is he can handle the fries and curds himself... just send a can of the gravey. Of course the canned stuff from St. Huberts or any of the others is no where near as good as from a waggon but he's from Brazil... what does he know.
colonelcrisp
quote:
Originally posted by Moral Hazard
My guess is he can handle the fries and curds himself... just send a can of the gravey. Of course the canned stuff from St. Huberts or any of the others is no where near as good as from a waggon but he's from Brazil... what does he know.


I have an aunt in abitibi who owns a chip waggon.... ill get her to send me the good stuff
Silky Johnson
Can you buy gravy mix (powdered stuff) at the supermarket?? The best poutine is made with cheap packaged chicken gravy imo.


The only two things you need to make legit poutine are proper cheese curds and CHICKEN gravy. It has to be chicken!! Trust!
Silky Johnson
And yes it tastes amazing. now I want poutine.
colonelcrisp
quote:
Originally posted by Silky Johnson
Can you buy gravy mix (powdered stuff) at the supermarket?? The best poutine is made with cheap packaged chicken gravy imo.


The only two things you need to make legit poutine are proper cheese curds and CHICKEN gravy. It has to be chicken!! Trust!


if you insist on chicken gravy, the only way to go is the st hubert packs...

i prefer beef gravy myself which is why im a big fan of the Berthelet powder

also curly fries > straight cut fries for poutine... more surface area for gravy coating....

itsamemario
I applaud you for your effort, but I gotta give you a near failing grade for poor research.

This is the gravy you wanna use:

Written form: http://foodwishes.blogspot.no/2007/05/buttermilk-fried-chicken-why-didnt.html (scroll halfway down)

And fresh cheese curd really is a key ingredient if you're going for authentic Quebec style poutine. You should be able to get some at a dairy, if you can't find it in the store. In the larger industry-sized ones they'll probably have uses for it already, but if you're lucky you might find a family run one that would help you out.
If not, then here's a recipe.

I know the traditional recipe calls for beef gravy, but that's just propaganda spread by the The Man to keep you coming back to buy their poutine.

And yes, you WILL need to cut and fry your own fries. Oven-baked frozen won't do, unless you happen to find some really phat ones. I don't know how big your fingers are, but they should be about the size of your index finger.

Edit: The rennet for the curd you should be able to find in most health stores, but I'd recommend buying the cultures needed as making it yourself takes a few months. But then again, maybe a dairy could be helpful in this department.

Edit2: Or maybe they could help you out at the university you work at? They probably have a lab and a couple of thermophilic cultures.
This is of course based on a scenario where you want Poutine today.
If that's not the case then I'd simply order from that website.
Dykes_on_Jay
all of you non Quebs are so ing wrong. Twice cooked thick cut home fries. Cooked in peanut oil (original). Real cheese. Real sauce (beef). People that say packet sauce rules, have never had a poutine. The secret is a low acidity white vinegar to round it out. The fresher the curd cheese, the harder your will be. Viagra for fatties, and the best hangover cure.

I only ate it a few times a year, and for good reason. Any more, and good poutine will kill you.
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